Improve Your Business Through Atomic Habits

James Clear’s widely successful book Atomic Habits breaks down habits into four parts: the cue, craving, response, and reward.


This method shows readers how they can also form habits. Luckily, Clear’s formula can be applied to business.


4 Habits That Will Improve Your Business


The Cue


When developing a habit, Clear suggests making the cue as evident as possible.


A cue is an outside stimulus that reminds you of the habit you wish to form. Therefore, your goal is to make your business as obvious as possible.


With your advertising, you want your prospects and customers to see your ads and then associate them with the habit of buying from you.


To do this, make your ads big, bright, and hard to miss. Use large banners to capture attention with design that pops.


The Craving


After your customer has seen the cue, they then need to want your product or service.


Therefore make it as attractive as possible. Clear writes, “Every behavior is preceded by a prediction… every purchase is preceded by a prediction. The customer does not buy your product; they buy the prediction it creates in their mind.”


It’s your job to make that prediction as ideal as possible. Explain the benefits in a clear and compelling way. If possible, personalize the message to your client, sneak in some bandwagon advice (e.g., John Doe is doing/using it!), and use effective framing techniques.


The Response


“Great businesses remove every point of friction they can think of to make the desired behavior as easy as possible,” Clear says.


Break down the process into steps. Then try to eliminate or simplify the process. The easier it is to purchase from you, the more likely the customer is to do it.


The Reward


Make sure your customers feel instant happiness and success after their purchase. Your quality product and services should take care of the rest.


Interestingly, this reward is inversely related to the craving. If you make your product or service seem too good, then the customer’s expectations will not be met, and they will leave disappointed.


You may have secured one purchase, but another one is unlikely. If you make your product or service seem less attractive, then the customer’s expectations will be exceeded. That is if they even buy it. Finding the balance is key.


Your business will certainly improve if you use Clear’s formula. Simple, small changes can make big results!

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